FAQ

DO I HAVE TO GIVE UP MY ROUTINE MEDICAL
CARE?
Routine medical care is usually continued, at least initially. For
example, in the case of medical care involving cardiovascular
drugs, chelation is used ideally to correct biochemical imbalances
that lead to the need for such drugs. As underlying causes are
eased, the need for drugs is reduced. Since drugs reduce stress in
some areas and cause stress in others, eliminating drugs is
favorable. However, removing drugs prematurely is dangerous.
Drugs act like biochemical crutches. They should not be removed
as physical crutches should not be removed until the body is ready.
Until and if health improves to where the person is strong enough to manage safely
without drugs, drugs must be continued. Often with chelation
therapy, the need for pharmaceutical drugs is reduced.

CAN I KEEP MY PRESENT PHYSICIAN IF I HAVE
CHELATION THERAPY?

Patients may continue under the care of their present physicians.
Non-chelating physicians may participate in the program or simply
be kept updated as desired. Some patients do not wish to have their
doctors know they are receiving chelation therapy. Although not
advised, these wishes are usually respected.

IF I HAVE BYPASS OR BALLOON ANGIOPLASTY,
MAY I STILL HAVE CHELATION?

Chelation may be used before or following surgical procedures.
Chelation may be used to improve the integrity of the body so that
the person may be better able to handle the stress of the surgery.
Chelation may also be used following vascular surgery to prevent
blocking of the arteries that have been operated surgically as well
as to improve circulation in the remaining blood vessels.

WHAT IS IN THE CHELATION INFUSION?

One fourth to one liter of fluid is usually administered at a
predetermined rate. The fluid contains EDTA, nutrients including
vitamins, magnesium, buffers, and other additives which the
chelating doctor may deem appropriate for each individual patient

HOW SAFE IS CHELATION THERAPY?

By statistical comparison EDTA is safer than aspirin when the
protocol is followed Unlike surgical approaches, no strokes, deaths
nor heart attacks have been reported to be due to intravenous
chelation therapy, and fewer side effects are reported than with
many pharmaceutical medical treatments.

WHAT ARE POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS?

Major side effects are infrequently reported. Of the minor side
effects, the most frequent include discomfort or swelling at the site
from needle insertion during the infusion. These effects are
temporary. Other effects seen in practice that have been reported
include dizziness, muscle cramps, loss of appetite, kidney stress,
hypoglycemia, fluid overload, nutrient and mineral imbalance,
nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, fatigue, weakness, joint pains,
rash, postural hypotension,phlebitis, chills, and back pains. In the event that these conditions
occur, therapy is modified accordingly. Theoretically, other effects
may include seizures, congestive heart failure, and nutrient
deficiencies. Protocols have been created to address and prevent
these issues. Breaking loose of plaque leading to blocking of blood
vessels elsewhere has also been theorized but has not been proven to
be caused by chelation.

HOW DO I KNOW CHELATION THERAPY IS
WORKING FOR ME?

Generally people feel a difference in performance and comfort as a
disappearance in the signs or symptoms. As the number of infusions
increases with time, the effects become more dramatic. People with
circulatory conditions may experience less pain, tiredness, shortness
of breath, visual difficulties, heart rhythm irregularities, wrinkles,
age spots, joint immobility, and depression. Diagnostic tests
performed before, during and after therapy may show improved
blood flow and heart function through ultrasound measurements;
angiography, involving the injection of dyes into the arteries; and
ultra- fast cat scans, demonstrating anatomical changes without the
use of injections. Electrocardiograms and stress electro-cardiograms
identify functional improvement. Blood tests involving cholesterol,
toxic metals, blood sugar, and other chemical markers generally
tend to normalize. Pulmonary spirometric measurements, which
determine how much and how fast air can be exhaled, generally improve for most people with impaired pulmonary
function. Urine tests document the removal of toxic metals.
Measurements of the oxygen content, volume of blood perfusion,
and temperature of extremities may show improvement. A variety of
other tests also exist which validate the effects of the therapy.

HOW DO I KNOW I AM MAKING THE RIGHT
DECISION?

Reading literature available on chelation therapy, comparing the
statistics with that of other therapeutic regimes, having dialogue
with those people that have like conditions that have had chelation
therapy, visiting an office where these therapies are administered,
talking with the staff and patients, and consulting with the doctor
that administers chelation therapy are reasonable ways to gather
information to make an intelligent decision. Consulting other
doctors that have had first-hand experience with chelation therapy
for a second opinion is also reasonable. Sharing this book with your
doctor to review followed with a three-way telephone conversation
with a chelation specialist, your doctor, and yourself is another
approach.

DO OTHER THERAPIES ACHIEVE THE SAME
RESULTS?

Various alternatives exist to EDTA intravenous chelation therapy.
However, not one can be substituted entirely covering all that which
chelation does. Using a conglomeration of methods which best suit
the individual is the most logical alternative. Projected results in
terms of safety, speed, cost, quality, and quantity need to be
assessed for all applicable alternatives in order to responsibly
determine which strategies are best. Once the strategies are selected
and initiated, they must be monitored. Those which appear to be
beneficial are reinforced and those which do not appear to work are
stopped. Nobody can do all there is that may improve health.

IS CHELATION A NATURAL PROCESS?

Technically, the chemical process of chelation supplies the body
with nutrients, removes toxic materials and is involved in processes
vital for maintaining life. Biochemically chelation involves the
binding of metallic atoms to molecular structures with claw-like
chemical bonds. The resulting combination of the metal and the
molecular structure to which it is bound is called a chelate.
Chlorophyll is a chelate containing the metal magnesium. Chlorophyll is the major green pigment in plants.
Chlorophyll supplies the body with magnesium as a nutrient.
Magnesium is essential for numerous life- giving biochemical
processes. Hemoglobin is a chelate of iron. Hemoglobin is involved
in the transfer of oxygen to the tissues. Other substances may
combine with lead to form a chelate of lead and aid in elimination of
lead from the body. Lead interferes with normal biochemical
function leading to a variety of problems including impaired
immunity, thinking and vitality. The bio chemistry of life cannot
operate without chelation. Chelation therapy involves the
understanding and use of the chelation process to foster more
optimal function and repair.

MUST CHELATION THERAPY BE GIVEN
INTRAVENOUSLY TO BE EFFECTIVE?

Although EDTA is not suited for intramuscular injection, various
intramuscular metal binders are available. Each have properties and
uses not quite the same as the next. For instance, BAL
(dimercapropropanol) is as effective in removing mercury and
arsenic where as DFO (deferoxamine) is effective in removing
excess iron. Neither is as effective in addressing calcium and lead as
intravenous EDTA. Chelation may also be accomplished orally as
well as by injection.

WHAT IS ORAL CHELATION THERAPY?

Oral chelation by strict chemical definition involves ielate of taking
by mouth various substances that bind cygen to biochemically to
metallic minerals via “claw-like” bonds. In a broader clinical sense,
metal binders involving other kinds of bonds with similar effects,
are also called: chemical chelators. Thus, oral metal binders that
involve such including binding like garlic or DMSA
(dimercaptosuccinic acid) may be called oral chelators. However in
the strict tion chemical sense, such metal binders are not considered
true chelators. Oral chelating substances are numerous and have
diverse qualities.
Some chelating substances are naturally occurring. For example,
citric acid and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) are chelating substances
found in citrus fruit. Both substances can combine with toxic
metallic minerals and remove them from the body, however with
limitations. For example, many people who drink orange juice daily
have hardening of the arteries, heart attacks and strokes. Citric acid
and ascorbic acid may also be manufactured synthetically in
concentrated forms enabling larger amounts to be ingested
economically. Additionally, these nutritional chelating substances
may be combined with beneficial minerals such as magnesium to
enhance mineral assimilation, transport, and utilization in the body.
Garlic contains substances which bind with cadmium, lead and
mercury and help remove these toxic substances from the body.
Garlic may be taken orally in the diet or may be taken as processed
supplements in forms of capsules, liquids, powders, and tablets.
These metal binding substances when taken even in large quantities
do not approach the results or speed afforded by the addition of intravenous EDTA in many conditions.
EDTA is also used orally as a chelating substance. However, oral
EDTA not nearly as effective for the same purposes as intravenous
EDTA due to poor absorption through the intestinal walls.
DMSA is a synthetic oral metal binding substance available by
prescription. DMSA may be used to complement EDTA in that they
both remove lead. However, they also are dissimilar and therefore
may not totally replace one another. For example, EDTA is
considered effective in binding calcium whereas DMSA is not.
DMSA is much more effective in removing mercury from the body
than EDTA, although both bind mercury.
The various metal binding agents marketed throughout the world
have unique individual properties. Chelating specialists know how
to take advantage of the intrinsic qualities of these various
therapeutic agents to best serve patients’ needs.

HOW MANY? HOW OFTEN? HOW MUCH?

Individual needs for intravenous chelation therapy vary
with time and person. No two people are exactly the same. Determination of therapeutic regimes are based upon years of
experience, scientific studies, individual response, diagnostic tests,
etc.
The average course of therapy varies. For those who
wish preventive care, perhaps a course of 10 administrations would
be appropriate. For those with symptomatic atherosclerotic
conditions associated with severe chest pain and leg pain, perhaps
25-30 administrations are appropriate. For a person with severe
general atherosclerotic blockages complicated by other conditions,
40 or more may be given. The mean is about 25-30. Therapy is
generally administered on the average of one to three times weekly
during the course of therapy. Periodic maintenance therapy, such as
one administration monthly may or may not be necessary depending
on the individual need. The amount and frequency of EDTA use is
adjusted to individual need taking into account weight and physical
status. The average amount of EDTA is 3gm given over 3-4 hours.
Administering EDTA in lesser quantities in less time has met with
success However, some benefit may be lost.

WHO SHOULD HAVE CHELATION AND WHEN?

Most well and ill adults, and practically all practicing doctors are
candidates for preventive or remedial intravenous chelation care
Although degenerative processes are found relatively early in life,
chelation is restricted generally to children who have proven metal
toxicity. Today is the best time to start for most of us over age 30 for
preventive and therapeutic purposes.

WHAT KIND OF DOCTORS ADMINISTER
CHELATION?

Physicians who use chelation are accomplished in conventional
medicine. They are fully licensed M.D.s (medical doctors) and
D.O.s (doctors of osteopathy) as are their colleagues who do not
offer chelation therapy. Chelating physicians may be board certified
in other specialties and hold prestigious academic professional
appointments. Some are celebrated and internationally renowned
personalities. Others may be less known but equally important
doctors servicing urban and rural communities. Their medical
practices often incorporate various forms of health care to
complement standard medical practice. Most are well versed in
nutrition. All look beyond conventional medical wisdom to bring
further benefit to their patients.